Tidbits - October 1t 2019

TIDBITS by RALPH SHEALY


CUT THE TIES

  I’ve been a Braves fans since they moved to Atlanta in 1966, and since I got my first satellite I’ve watched practically every game they’ve played.
  That ended, unfortunately, about a month ago when Dish dropped the Fox sports channels that carry the Braves. Still, I kept up.
  I was happy when they wrapped up their division, then I watched an old familiar trend begin - Coxism.
  The Braves now have lost ten straight opening play-off series. The streak began with Bobby Cox, and was continued by protege Fredi Gonzalez, and then by his other protege Brian Snitker.
  Notice anything? Bobby Cox and his disciples can’t win in the playoffs,  because the other teams have smarter managers.
  Fredi and Snit learned from Cox and that is not good.
  The worst thing that happened top the Braves is they clinched early. Snit followed Bobby’s example and wholesale rested his players, particularly his stars.
  Did you notice his stars combined to hit about .150 each in the series against the Cards? They had lost all their momentum. They can get time off after the season!
  Cox, Gonzalez and Snit were and are terrible managers of pitchers.
  Any eight-year-old who knows anything about pitching can tell you Luke Jackson can’t pitch. He is horrible.
  So who does Snit bring in in game one with the Braves leading 3-1? You saw it. The first batter hit the ball to Chattanooga.
  After that, we fans knew he was not through giving up hits. But does Snit pull him? The inning ends with the game tied 3-3, and the Cardinals added four more runs to win.
  The Cox threesome also does not know how to manufacture runs. Twice in one of the playoff losses, they had bases loaded and came away with nothing.
  They allow batters to do what they want to do, like swinging on the first pitch, instead of waiting to get a pitch to drive.
  There is one solution to all of this. Get rid of all managers with Bobby Cox ties. They are all playoff losers.
  It doesn’t matter what you do in the regular season, if you can’t win in the playoffs.

NINETY SIXED

  Longtime Saluda Tiger fans know it doesn’t matter how good Saluda is or how bad Ninety Six is, Ninety Six finds a way.
  Many years during the long Ninety Six winning streak, the Tigers had a better team, but left the field a loser.
  Friday night, Saluda was highly favored.
  Someone commented to scoreboard operator Sam Shealy about how the Tigers shouldn’t have any problems with the Wildcats.
  Sam said he shook his head and said, “No, it’s Ninety Six.”
  The first half of Friday’s game, it looked like the Tigers were going to get Ninety Sixed again. The Wildcats gave the Tigers all they wanted. Twice Saluda scored and twice Ninety Six came back. The Tigers only led by a touchdown at halftime.
  The Tigers took control in the second half, outscoring Ninety Six 21-0 to win 43-13.
  Longtime fans breathed a sigh of relief.
  Hats off to the Wildcats for their efforts, and hats off to the Tigers for averting the Ninety Six curse.
  There are always football connections  between Ninety Six and Saluda, since the schools are only 17 miles apart.
  This year’s game had even more.
  The new Wildcat coach is Matthew Owings, a son of Saluda High graduate Dr. Andy Owens, and grandson of Connie Merchant Owings of Saluda. There are plenty of Saluda County Merchant cousins.
  On the coaching staff are Saluda natives B.J. Werts and Nick Long. Helping out is Nick’s brother Corbie.
  Wildcat kicker Tyler Steele is the grandson of Robert and Laurie Ann Vaughn, and Joyce and the late Junior Steele, all of Saluda.
  And to make me feel a whole lot older, Nick and Corby’s dad Chris Long, and Tyler’s dad, Benjie Steele, both played for the Yankee little league teams I coached.
  Oh, B.J. played while I coached, too!

STILL DONE

  I told you I was done with Carolina football, so it did not bother me one bit when the Gamecocks upset Number 3 Georgia Saturday.
  I didn’t watch. Oh, I kept up with the score and still taped the game. I had no hope that Carolina would actually win the game, even though the team led going into the fourth quarter.
  When I got the notification that the Gamecocks won 20-17 in double overtime, I had to see how that happened. How do you have two overtimes and the two teams combine for only three points?!!!
  This was a defining moment in Will Muschamp’s coaching career. He had lost 11 straight games against ranked teams, but he broke that streak against his alma mater at their place, playing a third team quarterback.
  The Gamecocks have looked like a pretty good football team the last two weeks. Two of the teams they lost to, UNC and Missouri have turned out to be good teams.
  To be honest, I thought Carolina was going beat this Saturday’s opponent Florida, and had no hope a 23 point underdog could beat Georgia. I guess the Bulldogs got Ninety Sixed!
  Where the Gamecocks go from here, who knows, but they sure gave their fans a thrill. Even, the ones who are done!

CASH’S CASH

  Little Cash Durst went into his room the other day and came out with some money he had earned.
 He told his parents, Clint and Heaven, one of his classmates lost everything in a house fire and he wanted to give him the money.
 The next day, 5-year-old Cash took the money to school and handed it to his little classmate. While someone was filming this, the two little boys hugged.
  What this world needs is a few billion more Cashes!

SIBLINGS

  With my sister Dibbie’s induction into the District Hall of Fame, she and I become the second set of siblings to be inducted.
  The first were Al and Mel Daniel.
  I guarantee you, Al and Mel could beat Dibbie and me in and two on two basketball game.

BOBBY BISHOP

  I’m sure going to miss Bobby Bishop.
  He died last week and I didn’t even know he was sick.
  I’d see Bobby at Raco when I took papers by, or he’d stop by the office on his walks around town.
  He always had something funny to say.
 He got it honest. His late father, Farr Bishop, was one of the funniest people I ever met.
  Old timers will remember his mother, Alice, as the longtime school lunch supervisor in Saluda schools.
  Rest in peace, old friend.